Short course trainers

 

Linda

Linda

  • What inspired you to become a trainer?
    I have always enjoyed being a student myself and being in a learning environment. I worked as a tutor while I was at university. Being a people person, I have always loved to help students reach their goals. As I am not getting any younger, transitioning from working long, physically demanding hours in a restaurant to becoming a hospitality trainer appealed to me in more ways than one!
  • What's the most rewarding aspect of being a trainer?
    When you make a positive impact on students and being able to share my knowledge and experience.
  • What unique approach do you bring to your training sessions?
    I have a casual and relaxed approach. I always try to share real life stories and encourage my students to share their own. I've even learnt a thing or two from my students! There is nothing worse than sitting in a classroom listening to a trainer reading verbatim from a slideshow.... BORING!
  • Share a memorable success story of a student you've trained.
    I recently had a student who suffered from severe social anxiety which had prevented them from completing courses in the past. Being able to support them through the course, seeing their confidence increase and how proud they were when they completed was really special.
Adam

Adam

  • What inspired you to become a trainer?
    I've been involved in training/coaching players in a number of sports for over 10 years, which I really loved doing. So, when I was looking for a career change from being an electrician, I decided, why not choose something I am passionate about.
  • What's the most rewarding aspect of being a trainer?
    The most rewarding aspect is witnessing a student enhance their knowledge and skills throughout the course.
  • What unique approach do you bring to your training sessions?
    I strive to create a relaxed environment, add a little humour, which always helps the students feel comfortable from the start.
  • Share a memorable success story of a student you've trained.
    I conducted a white card course for year 10 students at a local school. One particular student (whom I was warned might not stay in class for long) was so happy when he passed and received his certificate from me. His face lit up as if he had won the lottery. He said to me, 'This is the first certificate I have ever received from school.' The teachers were so surprised that he stayed in my course all day. It was nice to know I made a little difference in this student's life.
Deanna

Deanna

  • What inspired you to become a trainer?
    When I was the licensee of our pub, we had some backpackers join us from England and Germany. So I thought I'd use the spare time wisely and enrolled in a Cert IV Training and Assessing course. After completing the course, VERTO approached me to commence training in RSA and RCG, which I did once a month. Ah, those were the days. Training all day and then heading back to the pub to pull beers all night! It was at this point that I realised how good of a fit training would be for me once we sold the pub because I really enjoy talking, and I have a lot of experience to offer others who want to join the hospitality industry.
  • What's the most rewarding aspect of being a trainer?
    I've always been a talker, and I like to think I've got a good sense of humour. So when I hear people laughing at my jokes, it's pretty rewarding. Although sometimes I wonder if they're laughing with me or at me! On a serious note, what truly fills me with satisfaction is witnessing students who were once disengaged suddenly come alive in class. To see them actively participate, engage in discussions, and accomplish things they never thought possible, that's what makes it all worthwhile.
  • What unique approach do you bring to your training sessions?
    I have a knack for remembering names and faces, making every student feel valued and at home in my sessions. Plus, I'm good at reading the room and injecting humour at the right moment to lighten the mood and get everyone engaged. As for role-playing, I've been told I play the role of an intoxicated person a little too convincingly, it certainly makes for memorable and entertaining exercises!
  • Share a memorable success story of a student you've trained.
    I recall a middle-aged gentleman who initially seemed disinterested in the class, evident from his body language and mannerisms. Sensing his reluctance, I made a concerted effort to engage with him, valuing his input and referencing his knowledge throughout the session. The following day, he arrived early, and full of confidence. Months later, I bumped into him at the drive-through bottle shop, and we were both so excited to see each other.